Project Development Report – Step 11

Posted by on Apr 21, 2014 in social entrepreneurship | 0 comments

Before we start a social entrepreneurship project, we need to be sure we have a solid plan. The Project Development Report is a written document we construct in the early stages of planning our project. This report helps us see strengths and weaknesses in our plan. I strongly encourage you to write your Project Development Report before starting your project.

In previous posts, I have briefly written about steps 1-10. Here are those steps.

Step 1: Identify the people you seek to serve.
Step 2: List and describe the unmet primary needs of the people you seek to assist.
Step 3: Identify the unmet needs your project will seek to address.
Step 4: Investigate and report on the extent to which existing agencies are responding to the needs your planned project will seek to address.  
Step 5: Explain how your plan to assist the category of people you have selected is different from services currently being delivered to these people.
Step 6: Identify strengths and weaknesses in your plan.
Step 7: Attempt to make improvements in your planned project based on identified weaknesses.  
Step 8: Construct one goal and a few objectives for the program you want to deliver.
Step 9: Identify all important tasks that must be performed in order to make the project a success.
Step 10: Identify staff to perform the important tasks identified above and explain the division of responsibility. Distinguish between paid staff and volunteers. 

In this post, I would like to share some ideas about Step 11: Determine the total cost of your planned program with detailed breakdowns of costs and documentation of those costs.

So Step 11 is the budget, and there is potentially much detail here. In fact, there is a risk that you might become bogged down with detail, so please be sure this doesn’t happen. The problem is that there are two conflicting principles.

On the one hand, we are called on to provide an accurate, specific budget. On the other hand, as we are building our project idea, we cannot afford to lose ourselves in a quagmire of budget detail.

In most cases, there will be different drafts of the Project Development Report. Although estimates of costs are unacceptable in the final draft, they will be fine in an early draft. So when you start writing your first draft, allow yourself some flexibility that is not appropriate in the final draft.

Even estimates of costs will allow you to see an approximation of what kind of budget you will need for your project, and this first confrontation with overall cost is important. Sometimes, we are shocked at how much our project idea will cost. The great value of even the first draft of Step 11 is to help us get a feel for the financial aspect of our project idea.

If we use estimates of costs in early drafts of our Project Development Report, we need to remember that more work lies ahead. In our final draft, we must determine actual costs, and as related to equipment (such as a desk and computer) we must cite costs from specific providers on the market now. In our Appendix, we will refer to model numbers of equipment, and exact costs from identified vendors.

I want to mention again that I encourage small projects for start-up. Simple, small projects are less expensive and more manageable than large, complex projects. Testing our idea by starting small, and then expanding as success increases, seems like a smart approach.

Thank you for reading my small blog.

Best regards. – Keith

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Project Development Report – Step 10

Posted by on Apr 15, 2014 in social entrepreneurship | 0 comments

I am continuing to work my way through all 15 steps in a written document that is like a business plan for social entrepreneurship projects. This is called the Project Development Report. In previous posts, I have discussed steps 1-9.

Step 1: Identify the people you seek to serve.
Step 2: List and describe the unmet primary needs of the people you seek to assist. 
Step 3: Identify the unmet needs your project will seek to address.
Step 4: Investigate and report on the extent to which existing agencies are responding to the needs your planned project will seek to address.  
Step 5: Explain how your plan to assist the category of people you have selected is different from services currently being delivered to these people.
Step 6: Identify strengths and weaknesses in your plan.
Step 7: Attempt to make improvements in your planned project based on identified weaknesses.  
Step 8: Construct one goal and a few objectives for the program you want to deliver.
Step 9: Identify all important tasks that must be performed in order to make the project a success.

By the time we reach Step 9 in the Project Development Report, we often have quite a document already built, but we have six more steps to complete the report. Here is Step 10: Identify staff to perform the important tasks identified above, and explain the division of responsibility. Distinguish between paid staff and volunteers.

In the previous step (number 9), we listed all important tasks to make our project a success. In this next step, we identify people who have the responsibility for each task. We actually list work positions (such as Project Director, Trainer #1, or Volunteer), rather than listing the names of people. Indeed, at this stage of planning, we will often not know what specific individuals will be filling most positions.

Step 10 has two major purposes, 1) to make sure we realize what workers will be needed to complete the important tasks, and 2) to provide a document that we can use to show possible donors and granting agencies that all important tasks have been assigned to work positions. To have such detailed plans even before the start of a project is impressive to others, and this helps reduce surprises when we start the project.

A large, complex project will likely require many workers, while a small, simple project will likely require few workers. I am a strong supporter of small and simple when we start projects. If you start small, then the number of workers will be minimal, and this is a strength. I encourage you to start small.

In Step 10, we should also indicate what staff positions are paid, and which are volunteer positions. Many popular social entrepreneurship projects depend on volunteers, and it is fine to include volunteer positions within our plan. But we should recognize that this is an area where our high expectations about our project can hurt our report. We might be tempted to assume an ease in securing volunteer workers, when we later find difficulty recruiting volunteers. My point here is to try to be cautious in predicting the number of volunteers we will be able to recruit.

Step 10 reflects one more cog in successfully organizing our project idea. After this step, we have only five more parts to our Project Development Report.

Thank you for reading my small blog.

Best regards. – Keith

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Primary social entrepreneurship compared to secondary social entrepreneurship

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in social entrepreneurship | 0 comments

In my teaching of social entrepreneurship, my focus is on innovation – finding new ways to help categories of people in need. New ideas that can be the basis of a new project are exciting. Those of us promoting social entrepreneurship projects should encourage a constant search for innovative ideas.

What about replications of existing innovative projects? Should we call a replication social entrepreneurship also? My conclusion is “yes.” Although the person who first starts an innovative project is more innovative than a person who copies it, there is some important innovation even in simply repeating an existing program in a new location.

A new location with different people requires adaptation to difference. In some cases, this adaptation involves some small innovation. In addition, people often add some refinement to the previously existing project idea. Often, the refinements involve some innovation.

I suggest we call the first offering of an innovative idea “primary social entrepreneurship,” and we call a replication “secondary social entrepreneurship.” A project can be started for the first time only once, but replications could happen hundreds or thousands of times. Thus, more “net good” can be accomplished through secondary social entrepreneurship than through primary social entrepreneurship.

For those who want to make a difference in our world through social entrepreneurship, the most fruitful path is replication.

1. Identify the category of people you want to assist.

2. Become highly familiar with the people and key issues surrounding them.

3. Study successful projects that can be replicated, and select one.

4. Build your project using the one you selected as a guide.

Innovation is difficult to “make” happen. Please consider following a highly successful existing social entrepreneurship project. It seems that much more good can be done in our world through replications of social entrepreneurship projects than through original projects.

Thank you for reading my small blog.

Best regards. – Keith

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Diane Latiker, social entrepreneur – CNN Hero

Posted by on Apr 1, 2014 in non profit organization, social entrepreneurship | 1 comment

I want to share some information about a person who must have something wrong with her. The word “crazy” crosses my mind. She is “different” the way so many true heroes are different from most other people.

I am continuing my introductions of five CNN Heroes who have graciously agreed to work with my university department (Sociology and Social Work) and me on our social entrepreneurship master’s degree program. In three previous posts, I shared information about three other amazing people, Pushpa Basnet from Nepal, Eddie Canales from Texas (USA), and Jackson Kaguri from Uganda.

Some of the following comes from the CNN Hero web site.

Ms. Latiker lives in Chicago (USA), and she is driven to help young people in her neighborhood and beyond deal with their difficulties and become successful. Gangs are a part of Ms. Latiker’s neighborhood.

Ms. Latiker wanted to insulate her youngest daughter from the gang members, but she knew that was impossible. Ms. Latiker took the unusual step of inviting gang members, as well as other youth in the neighborhood, into her home. In the early days, before any formal project emerged, she was not certain what would happen when rival gang members were in her home. One time, she had youth from six different gangs in her home at one time. Ms. Latiker opened her home 24 hours a day, seven days a week to neighborhood youth. What?

I’m sure that “crazy” is not the right word to use to describe Ms. Latiker, but…..

Ms. Latiker is driven like other heroes who sometimes place themselves in dangerous situations because of a commitment to a cause. Heroes are found in war. They are also found in everyday life. Many social entrepreneurs are heroes, for they are so strongly committed to a worthy cause that they almost don’t care what happens to them.

I believe Ms. Latiker is a true hero, and I greatly admire her.

She quit her job to focus on spending more time working with youth in her area, and she eventually  started a nonprofit called Kids Off the Block (KOB). Still using her home, the number of youth eventually exceeded the space. Several donors contributed money for a bus, but when Ms. Latiker asked if that money could be used to buy the building next door to her house, which was the same price, the answer was yes.

That building became the KOB Community Center, and from 30 to 50 youth use the Center each day for various activities including tutoring, counseling, sports, and drama.

What an amazing story that began very small and with no intention of starting a nonprofit organization.

When you have time, please read the full story on the CNN Hero web site. The address is: http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/cnn.heroes/archive11/diane.latiker.html

Thank you for reading my small blog.

Best regards. – Keith

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Jackson Kaguri, social entrepreneur – CNN Hero

Posted by on Mar 24, 2014 in non profit organization, social entrepreneurship | 0 comments

It is my honor to be working with five CNN Heroes who are sharing their on-the-ground knowledge about running successful social entrepreneurship projects with the master’s degree program in social entrepreneurship I oversee. Their insight brings an important added dimension to our social entrepreneurship training. My department and I are grateful for their involvement.

In two previous posts, I briefly shared the work of Pushpa Basnet in Kathmandu, Nepal, and Eddie Canales in Schertz, Texas, U.S.A. Continuing alphabetically, I would now like to share information about the important work of Mr. Jackson Kaguri.

Mr. Kaguri was born and raised in a remote village (Nyakagyezi) in Uganda. He was successful educationally, and he moved to the United States. However, he continued returning to his home village to stay connected with his family and friends, and to bring school supplies to the children. He was shocked to observe the change that came to his village and nation, the killing disease of HIV/AIDS. The death was not a distant reality, for it struck his family and friends in his home village.

When people “escape” an undesirable situation, such as a poor village, I have observed that they don’t always return. Some who have moved from an undesirable situation and become successful never look back. The relief of this escape must be tremendous.

But thankfully, some feel obligation. Such is the situation for Mr. Kaguri.

In addition to the sadness of death that came to his home village in Uganda, the relatively quick loss of middle aged adults to AIDS created many children with no parents. These are known as AIDS orphans, and the primary caregivers to these orphans are the grandmothers of the children.

The following information comes from the CNN Heroes web site.

On one visit to his home village in 2001, one morning as Mr. Kaguri was waking up, he found many grandmothers surrounding the house. They asked him to help. He and his wife eventually decided to spend their life savings to start a school in Nyakagyezi to help make a better life for the AIDS orphans in his vaillage. That school started in 2003, with 56 students.

When Mr. Kaguri learned that one student was walking 30 miles to attend his school, he started a second school in a neighboring village. He now runs two schools, with 587 students. The schools provide uniforms, school supplies, education, and meals while the children are at school.

In addition, Mr. Kaguri is focusing attention on the grandmothers who raise these orphans. He provides small loans for the grandmothers to start small businesses, and he provides seeds for growing vegetables. Mr. Kaguri views the grandmothers as pillars of the society, unsung heroes that others don’t recognize.

Mr. Kaguri works in the U.S. and visits Uganda and his schools three times a year. He devotes much of his time when in the U.S. to raising money to fund his schools.

What a compelling story this is of a young man who became successful and moved out of poverty into affluence. Thank you, Jackson, for looking back, and for making a difference.

Please visit the CNN Hero web site and read more about Mr. Kaguri and his project.
http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/cnn.heroes/2012.heroes/jackson.kaguri.html

Thank you for reading my small blog.

Best wishes. – Keith

PS – My free social entrepreneurship course available to anyone in the world starts on March 26. The following site has a link to learn more and register.
http://gotmooc.net/

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Project Development Report – Step 9

Posted by on Mar 17, 2014 in grant writing, non profit organization, social entrepreneurship | 0 comments

I would like to continue reporting on the Project Development Report, which is like a “business plan” for a social entrepreneurship project. This plan should be constructed before the project is started.

In earlier posts, I covered Steps 1-8.

Step 1: Identify the people you seek to serve.
Step 2: List and describe the unmet primary needs of the people you seek to assist.  
Step 3: Identify the unmet needs your project will seek to address.
Step 4: Investigate and report on the extent to which existing agencies are responding to the needs your planned project will seek to address.  
Step 5: Explain how your plan to assist the category of people you have selected is different  from services currently being delivered to these people.
Step 6: Identify strengths and weaknesses in your plan.
Step 7: Attempt to make improvements in your planned project based on identified weaknesses.  
Step 8: Construct one goal and a few objectives for the program you want to deliver.

I will now briefly discuss Step 9 in the Project Development Report: Identify all important tasks that must be performed in order to make the project a success.

This section of your Project Development Report has the potential to be long. We do not want to take space in this document for unnecessary detail, so we need to remember this should include only the important tasks, tasks that outsiders need to know to understand the project.

This section of the report is often called “activities” or “procedures.” I will call these tasks procedures.

The focus of this section is on agency activities. (Note how different procedures are from objectives. In Step 8 reported earlier, I mentioned that objectives focus on client behaviors. It is important to remember that procedures focus on agency behaviors.)

Procedures are tasks that staff will perform, such as:

-          Hiring a project director
-          Recruiting volunteers
-          Reserving rooms for educational sessions
-          Preparing educational materials
-          Testing the extent to which objectives were attained

Every important action by the agency to make the project a success should be reported in the sequence that the steps will occur. By writing down this detail, we are forced to possibly think in more detail than we had previously thought regarding tasks that must be performed. In addition, this detail helps outsiders (such as donors and grant funding sources) understand that we have devised a detailed, reasonable step-by-step plan for making the project a success.

In many cases, no agency will exist as one is preparing this section of the Project Development Report. No problem. You are working with a project idea before the project is started. Sometimes, you will be building your project idea before an agency is started. This is normal.

Before I close, I want to again mention the free online social entrepreneurship course I am teaching that starts on March 26. Please help spread the word.          http://gotmooc.net/

Thank you for reading my small blog.

Best wishes. – Keith

                                                                       © Keith Campbell

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Free social entrepreneurship training for anyone, anywhere in the world: Starts March 26

Posted by on Mar 10, 2014 in non profit organization, social entrepreneurship | 1 comment

Hello, colleagues. The days go by, and our world changes ever more quickly. Sometimes, I feel dragged by the change.  

Although most change I experience is way beyond my sphere of influence (thus I feel dragged along wherever we as a world are headed), it is humans who create most of the changes we experience. Thus, you and I have the opportunity to be change creators, to shape our world.

I guess that is part of what this blog is about, encouraging people to step forward to start projects to help others in need. When we start a small project to help others, we are making a big difference in the lives of a few people and a small difference in our world. When many people start small projects, we have the potential to make a big difference in our world.

Last October, I taught my first free course on social entrepreneurship for anyone in the world. My course was a part of a fairly new educational movement focused on providing free worldwide training. These courses are called MOOCs (Massive, Open, Online Courses). The very creation of these courses is an example of social entrepreneurship – bringing free online education to anyone in the world.

My first course had 844 participants representing 54 nations. By MOOC standards, this was not a big enrollment, but I was pleased. What really attracted my attention was the 54 nations represented. This is more than 25% of the nations of the world.

My university has given me permission to teach this free course again, and the start date is March 26.

This MOOC allows interaction with other students from around the world, as well as the opportunity to ask me questions about social entrepreneurship issues. The purpose of the course is to help participants build their skills to start successful social entrepreneurship projects.

Would you please help spread the word about this course?

Here is the address to a web site that has more information, as well as a link to register:

http://gotmooc.net/ 

Thanks for any help you can provide, and thank you for reading my small blog.

Best wishes. – Keith

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